Paypal’s bypass for two-factor authentication (2FA)

A recent Two-factor authentication flaw in the PayPal system allows carders to take advantage of the payment processor.

We found 2FA flaws in PayPal, including risky attacks that might let anyone defeat their two-factor authentication (2FA) and the ability to distribute malicious code via their SmartChat platform. We discuss each vulnerability in more depth below, along with the reasons we think it’s so risky.

You can avoid PayPal’s phone or email verification using this method, which we’ll refer to as two-factor authentication for simplicity’s sake (2FA). When a user connects into their account from a new device, location, or IP address, their two-factor authentication—known on PayPal as “Authflow”—is typically triggered.

With this method you can bypass PayPal’s phone or email verification, which for ease of terminology we can call two-factor authentication (2FA). Their Two-factor, which is called “Authflow” on PayPal, is normally triggered when a user logs into their account from a new device, location or IP address.

two factor bypass
Paypal's bypass for two-factor authentication (2FA) 3

What is PayPal 2FA authentication?

PayPal 2FA is a security system that requires two distinct forms of identification in order to access something. Two-factor authentication can be used to strengthen the security of an online account, a smartphone, or even a door.

How to bypass PayPal Two-factor?

 

Benefits of bypassing 2faStolen PayPal credentials are very cheap on the black market. Essentially, it’s exactly because it’s so difficult to get into people’s PayPal accounts with stolen credentials that these stolen credentials are so cheap. PayPal’s carding outflow is set up to detect and block suspicious login attempts, usually related to a new device or IP, besides other suspicious actions. But with our 2FA bypass method, that security measure is null and void. Carders can buy stolen credentials in bulk, log in with those credentials, bypass 2FA in minutes, and have complete access to those accounts. With many known and unknown stolen credentials on the market, this is potentially a huge loss for many PayPal customers.

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